BMW 6 Coupé
 
 
 
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This was the first model I built after the end of my "dark ages". It all started again when I bought the 8880 Supercar in 1997 (See "My LEGO Story" for more details). After you have assembled such a technic chassis, it seems inevitable that at some point you decide to build your own custom bodywork for it. The first thing that came to my mind was trying to recreate the car I personally own (which is coincidentally one of my dream cars, too).

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Utilizing the advantage of having a 1/1 "scale model" at hand, I decided to build a rendition of the BMW 6 Coupé. I started by building only the front part to see if creating such a car is possible at all. I was very pleased with the first prototypes, but I soon realized that I had another major problem. My current supply of Lego bricks (the remains of my childhood) would get me nowhere, because I still had a truck, trailer and transformer assembled, so the rest of my supply was close to zero.

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And the one thing I would never do is to take these models apart. So new bricks had to be acquired. As Toys'R'Us was selling the 8880 at half the price, I went back there and bought another 3 of them. Now I had a lot of technic bricks, but what was missing were a lot of plates to build the bodywork of the car. My friend was kind enough to sell me his modified "lambo-style" 8880, so now I had a few plates to go along with. I completed the bodywork, but after that the model resided unfinished on one of my shelves for a long time.
Finally in 2000, when the new 8448 "Super Car Mk II" came out, I got back to it, added the new suspension and wheels from the 8448 set and build the whole interior and engine stuff. Because the shock absorbers couldn't withstand the weight of the finished model, I had to replace them with stiff parts.

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Notice the triangular toolbox mounted beneath the hood of the trunk (standard equipment for every BMW).
The image on the left depicts my childhood attempts to create a model of a BMW Coupé.

 
 
 

The doors, hood, trunk, sunroof and glove compartment of my model can be opened. The doors even have small compartments for keeping stuff. I used numerous hinges for the wheel arches to recreate their round shape.

Model dimensions:
length: 66,5cm, width: 23.5cm (w/o mirrors)
weight: approx. 5kg

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Damn, I just noticed that my model lacks the fuzzy dice! I'm going to correct this as soon as I can, heh heh. But apart from that, my model has numerous features, including a mechanism for opening and closing the sunroof. Notice the tape lying on the dashboard. Additional tapes can be stored in the glove compartment. In older BMWs, the middle part of the dashboard (with gadgets like a/c, stereo, etc.) is slightly bent towards the driver, so I had to consider this for my model, too.

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I used the new "click-hinges" from the Star Wars sets for all of the four seats to attach the backrest to the base of the seats.
The armrest between the backseats can of course be tilted.

 
 
 
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I made some minor updates recently, when I found out that clear pulley wheels exist. They look really great as headlights. I also added some BMW stickers and (most important!) 2 soccer balls at the rear mirror.

 
 
 
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Opening the hood (achieved by operating a lever beneath the left side of the dashboard, just like the real thing) reveals the 6-Cylinder engine. The real BMW M30 engine has 218 Hp. My model's engine has 6 working pistons, but doesn't have a gearbox (My car has automatic transmission anyway).
Compare the different real engine parts to their corresponding Lego counterparts on the images below, including air filter, fuse box, battery, wiper fluid box, radiator fan and brake fluid tank.

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The generator is actually a gearbox from an old Lego 4.5V motor, but it's shape was just right.

The fiber optic isn't attached to any electricity and is for show purposes only.

 
 
 
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